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Posts Tagged ‘scott kelby’

Judging photo contests is something I’m asked to do from time to time. I had the enjoyable task of choosing the best photo from a recent photo walk (yes, the one I posted earlier). That winning entry, by Kristina Johnson, was chosen as the best of over one hundred photos.

Kristina Johnsons winning entry, ladybug road

Kristina Johnson's winning entry, "ladybug road"

So, you might ask, what does a judge look for when judging a photo contest? Hmmm, that’s a toughie. Well, we all know that photography, like any visual art, is subjective. A photo I like might not get a second glance from another photographer/judge. Photo contests are much like beauty contests in that there’s a lot of pretty entrants and most will be going home without a crown.

Here’s how I approach judging photo contests. In many ways, it’s the same way I edit photos for my newspaper. First, I take a quick pass through all the images. This is when I’ll bounce the unsharp, off-color and poorly-exposed images out. This first purge will usually knock out a quarter to a third of the entries and leave me with photos that deserve a closer look.

On the second pass, I’m looking for images that are different. Different techniques, compositions and subject matter are king here. If it makes me do a double-take it goes on to the final round. Here’s also where I factor in the type of photography being judged. For example, I’ll approach judging a photojournalism contest differently than I would a nature photography competition. In the former, capturing the “moment” and telling a story is most important. In the later, form, color and composition play a bigger role.

The final selection is the toughest. Here’s where I earn my money (well, not really, I’m lucky to get a meal or free drinks). This is where I look very critically at the remaining images. I want a photo to “move” me and stir my emotions. I’m also looking for the photo I wish I had taken myself. Finally, I want the winning image to “wow” me. If I’m excited about an image and it meets all the criteria mentioned above, it’s my winner.

I’m sure my approach is unique. My experience as a photographer and photo editor for almost three decades affects the way I look at photographs. This is why I advocate multiple judges for photo contests. Entrants deserve to have their work seen (and judged) through more than one person’s eyes. Plus, it’s more fun to watch the judges argue!

One last bit of advice. If you ever have a chance to watch a contest judging session, do it. Being there and hearing the comments made by judges will help you better understand how your work is seen by others. Usually, the judges will explain why they like one photo over another. The discussions over why one photo is better than another will give you insight into the judges’ visual thought processes and will definitely affect the way you approach your next photo session.

For me, judging a photo contest is exciting, energizing and exhausting. That said, I never say “no” to the opportunity to judge a contest. It’s fun and, sometimes, I even get fed!

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The weather was great, more than 30 people showed up…a good time for all. I was overwhelmed by the enthusiasm of my group as we gathered at Huntington Park in Newport News, Virginia. We spread out across the park and got to work soon after the 10 a.m. start time and, though many started their day shooting photos in the rose garden, we eventually spread out and found subjects to shoot in every corner of the park.

Photo walker Jeff Abrahamson composes his photo in the rose garden.

Photo walker Jeff Abrahamson composes his photo in the rose garden.

We made photos for a couple hours and re-convened at a local pizza joint for lunch and heavy duty photo talk. I was pleased to see how shooters from all skill levels intermingled, looked over each others photos and shared their experiences shooting in the park. When the day was over, I asked for suggestions for making the next photo walk even better. The overwhelming reply?  “IT WAS OVER TOO SOON!

Take a look at their work at the Flickr page devoted to this photo walk. You’ll be sorry you missed the fun

Even I managed to find a different angle on a park statue

A different angle and dramatic lighting helped make my photo of this sculpture stand out.

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